Ignite the flame that will help you guide your way through the darkness and return with a story to tell.

Spanish

Not Your Romantic Vampire

The Strain Trilogy

 I love vampires and in the past few years I have indulged in the guilty pleasure of reading the Southern Vampire Mysteries by Charlaine Harris: yes the ones about True Blood and Sookie Stackhouse. Before them I loved reading the Vampires Chronicles by Anne Rice until I got to Memnoch the Devil, which lost it for me, though I will say that I very much enjoyed Pandora, which is not quite part of the Vampire Chronicles. In the very beginning I read Dracula by Bram Stoker. The book took two efforts to get into it since the language is older and the way the book is presented, a compilation of diary entries and newspaper articles, is something for a 20th and 21st century mind to get used to. Once I found my rhythm, the 500 plus pages melted away as the pages seemed to be turned by the characters themselves.

It seems that in the beginning vampires were cruel and vicious as you can read about in “Carmila” and the “Vampyre,” then somewhere around Interview with a Vampire they became nicer drawing from us sympathy and even admiration. BUt throughout all earlier vampire stories there was a romance atmosphere, same as with most early gothic fiction, which I would say could be called gothic romance for multiple reasons. Then Twilight and True Blood happened and vampires became the hottest undead on the block, like rock stars even. I have some friends who say no they are monsters as we should either run away or destroy them. I understand what they are saying and I agree, but I also believe that vampires and romance go hand in undead hand.

But I do love a good scare from something different and imaginative so enter The Strain by Chuck Hogan and Guillermo del Toro. 

Like so many of the book I read I found this book in mass-market form at a library book sale back in 2010. The cover caught my eye and the description said that I should read this before the other books I bought that day. Two days late I finished the book and was quickly trying to find the second book, The Fall.

Yesterday I finished the third book of the trilogy, The Night Eternal, and though the first book is by far the best, the whole trilogy is terrifying. This is horror in vampires, and these are not your traditional vampires. They are more like zombies controlled like drones through their original maker, their master.

Since Guillermo del Toro is one of the co-authors all signs point to this being a movie one day, but I think it would make a better TV series then a movie. As I was reading the first book it felt like reading a script for a series, which worked well for the story. Throughout the trilogy, but mostly in the first book, are these side scenes where we see the simultaneous impact of these horrible creatures. We see that they are merciless and are nothing to be desired.

Over all I found these books to be creative, fun and entertaining. I am a huge fan of del Toro’s films and now I am a fan of his books. There are several book trailers that are fun to watch which you can see here and here.

Before I end I need to give an ‘I’m Sorry’ to Chuck Hogan whom I had never heard of before I read these books. He is the author of The Town, which was made into a great film with Ben Affleck and Jeremy Renner. Sometimes writers slip by and we do not hear about them.

Happy Reading,
ORB


Banned Books are the best ones

I do not know what is more sad, that people in this world see a need to ban books or that it happens so often we have a Banned Books Week, which happens to be this week. Check it out here. It really exists. Now I can think of some books that I would never allow into my personal library or if I owned a bookstore I would never carry, unless a customer asked me to order a copy of said book. But this is my own personal opinion which allows me to have what ever books I want to fill up the shelves in my library. I cannot understand why people would want to go through the trouble to ban books from public libraries and school libraries.

When I first heard that books were being banned I was young and thought that it was an isolated incident. Sadly it is not as this map will show you what parts of the country are banning what books. Some of these books, Slaughter House Five, Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird, are some of the first books I have ever read and loved. Other, Brave New World and the Twilight Series, are not as well received, but that should not matter.

My biggest fear in this world is when a group of people starts something, where does it end? You ban one book because you say it contradicts the bible, as is what happened here. Does that not give the same rights of other people to ban the bible? I do not want either banned. I would like people to read for themselves and decided what is right and wrong. 

This brings me to my gothic twist. There is a great book entitled The Monk by Matthew Lewis. The story is about a devout monk named Ambrosio living in Madrid, Spain sometime in the 17th century, The people of the church and of the community say that he is without sin and has never broken a single rule of his order. He is extremely popular thanks to his sermons and his dedication to the church and the Holy Bible.

He came to the church as a baby, abandoned on the steps of the abbey. His entire life is spent living in the church and being educated by the words and lessons of the faith. The book follows his down fall as his life both outside and inside becomes complicated with emotions of love and lust. He is first tempted by a fellow monk who reveals himself to be a woman in disguise. Later he falls in love with an innocent girl. I shall not spoil the rest of his fall into villainy, but I shall say that book makes it clear that the only reason why he lived 30 years with out sin was due to the fact that he was cut off from the real world outside the abbey. He had no exposure to people outside the church.

He was in fact censored and grew up not knowing any aspects of the real world.

The book, The Monk was itself banned upon its original publication in 1796. This is due to the fact that the book is an attack on the brutality of the Catholic Church in Spain during the Inquisition.

Books teach us valuable lessons from the world that we would normally not experience in our everyday lives. We learn about different characters from different lands with different languages and customs. There is nothing to be gained by banning books. It does not make those parts of the world go away. It deepens our ignorance and proves the adage that the greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world that he does not exist.

Join me in reading a banned book. My book of choice: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In this world, books are not just banned, they are burned because the contradict the existence of the society.

Happy Reading,

ORB


Shadow of the Wind

I have a deep love for books and library book sales are a great place to stock up on titles you are looking for and titles you have never before seen. Once upon a time while scanning the volumes at a library book sale I noticed the spine of a book that read “The Shadow on the Wind.” The title was unknown to me as was the author. Though it was not the first book I picked up at that sale it was the one that hooked my eye with more curiosity. I picked it out of the rest and learned it was a novel by Carlos Ruiz Zafón. I have read books my Arturo Perez Reverte, but this was the first I have heard of this author. At the risk of judging a book by its cover, I was taken into its appeal and wanted it. It only cost a dollar and was well worth the risk. The description on the back of the paperback read:

A story about a mysterious book with an even more mysterious author and a boy trapped in middle during post World War II Spain? Sold. What the jacket does not tell you is that the boy, Daniel, discovers the book will wandering through the tall stacks of books in a used bookstore. The owner of the store is the Daniel’s father’s friend who grants him the choice of any book he wishes among his vast collection. Out of the masses he finds this book by Julian Carax. As I read the story I could not help but think about how I found the book and I wondered if there was anyone else who found this book in a used bookstore, on a cart outside a shop, at their local library and felt the magic as they read each page.

What moved me the most was the when Daniel reads the novel for the first time. It reminded me of the first time I fell deeply into a story and would not come out until I had finished it. I realized that there is a personal and lonesome quality about books. We invite the story into our minds and let them swim around touching memories and emotions both painful and pleasurable. We read, mostly, when we are alone and in a quiet place and only after we finish reading do we share our thoughts and passion for the story. It is not often that people read to one another. Reading is not like having a dinner party and enjoying a feast and drinks with friend and family. I never read to anyone and when I am reading and when I am done reading I fill pages of my journal with what I liked or did not like about the book.

The descriptions in this story are rich in imagination, to the point where I want to find the fictional author Carax and read his work.  Zafon has become one of my favorite authors since I finished that first book. Later I shall share with you my thoughts of his first published novel, The Prince of Mist.

To learn more about him you can find his website here and a list of his other books here and here.

If you have read this book or any other book by him, please share your thoughts.

Happy Reading,

ORB