Ignite the flame that will help you guide your way through the darkness and return with a story to tell.

Short Stories

Halloween

Halloween is my favorite holiday and not because of ghost stories and horror films, though I am partial to a good thriller or a good cult classic. Halloween is probably the oldest tradition that humans still practice even though the names and exact tradition of this celebration have changed. This is a unique time of year where everything changes. The weather grows colder causing the leaves to change and increasing the value of the harvest. I know that the harvesting and preserving of crops is not as clearly as important to the modern world, but once upon a time with out the harvest there was no surviving the coming winter. Once there were people that gave sacrifice to guarantee that the spring returned. Many people once feared that when the weather grew cold, the spring and summer would never return.

But rather than go through the history of Halloween, which can be easily googled, I want to talk what stories put me in the Halloween and autumn spirit.

First, are the stories of Ray Bradbury. Perhaps my favorite author, Bradbury writes with great imagination but in a way that is cleverly entertaining. His stories are scary yet still fun and not as challenging to read at Lovecraft. My favorite collection of short stories is The October Country (1955). All of the 19 stories are worth reading and of them my favorites are “The Lake,” “The Emissary,” “The Scythe,” and “The Man Upstairs.” One of these stories is about the grim reaper, another about a zombie, and one is about a vampire, but I’ll let you find out which one is which.

Continuing with Bradbury is a book that is, in its typical Bradbury way, a story made up of short stories. The books is called From the Dust Returned. I first read it last October and it was unlike any other book I have ever read. The stories are beautiful. Even though they are connected, they can stand alone, which can be challenging at times. I shall give you this hint. It can be tricky to get into, but I promise that it is worth it. I found myself rereading the first chapter/story in order to ground myself in the weird Bradbury world.

Moving away from Bradbury another author I love to read this time of year is Ambrose Bierce. He is a little old school, but still a great read. Bierce lived an interesting life. He was a soldier for the Union in the Civil War who made maps for the officers. After the war he became a great writer and wrote many fantastic haunted stories including “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” and “The Death of Halpin Frayser.” Owl Creek Bridge is a story that, like The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, I can read many times over and still feel like it is new. For more about Bierce enjoy this strange website.

For a much more modern author, I love the work of Neil Gaiman, who has written many great short stories in several collections. My favorite is M is for Magic. Of these 10 stories by two favorites are “Troll Bridge,” and “October in the Chair,” which is a tribute to the work of Ray Bradbury. Gaiman has also written a few young adults books that are great for this time of year. The Graveyard Book is an obvious choice, but I also like Coraline, which yes, was made into a film a few years ago. The film is a lot of fun, but the book is much better and has a great scene that was left out of the film.

Each year for October I feel a little overwhelmed by the amount of great ghost and horror stories there are to read. It is the same with novels as there are always too many to read and not enough time in the day and night to read them. Short stories are worse since books contain many short stories and when you read someone like Bradbury or Lovecraft you learn that they have written dozens and dozens and hundreds of short tales and novellas.

For me, Halloween is a great time to put down the novel and indulge in all the short stories I can find time for. This year, my focus is on H.P. Lovecraft. I have read some of his work before and loved what I have read. Even though he is a terrible author when it comes to dialogue, his monstrous descriptions make him the king of horror.

Tell me about what short stories and authors you like to read during this time of year.

Happy Reading,

ORB

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